DECORATING A SMALL OFFICE SPACE. DECORATING A SMALL


Decorating A Small Office Space. 1930's Home Decor.



Decorating A Small Office Space





decorating a small office space







    decorating
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it

  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)





    space
  • an empty area (usually bounded in some way between things); "the architect left space in front of the building"; "they stopped at an open space in the jungle"; "the space between his teeth"

  • Position (two or more items) at a distance from one another

  • (in printing or writing) Put blanks between (words, letters, or lines)

  • Be or become distracted, euphoric, or disoriented, esp. from taking drugs; cease to be aware of one's surroundings

  • place at intervals; "Space the interviews so that you have some time between the different candidates"

  • the unlimited expanse in which everything is located; "they tested his ability to locate objects in space"; "the boundless regions of the infinite"











decorating a small office space - Organizing Your




Organizing Your Craft Space


Organizing Your Craft Space



Every crafter wants a work space that's usable, attractive, and well-organised, and here's how to achieve that goal. Inside this spiral-bound guide, with colour-coded pages for easy reference, are hints, tips, and dos and don'ts for each individual craft. There are craft categories so that individual problems are addressed (Mosaic and stained glass, knitting and crocheting, needlepoint and embroidery, scrapbooking and papercrafts, painting, beading, stencilling and rubber stamping, and sewing and fabric crafts). Plus, professional artists invite you into their studios to see how they keep things orderly, from smart storage to functional surfaces.










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General Post Office (GPO)




General Post Office (GPO)





The General Post Office (GPO) (Irish: Ard-Oifig an Phoist) in Dublin is the headquarters of the Irish postal service, An Post, and Dublin's principal post office. Sited in the centre of O'Connell Street, the city's main thoroughfare, it is one of Ireland's most famous buildings, and was the last of the great Georgian public buildings erected in the capital.
The GPO was at first located in a small building on the site of where the Commercial Buildings used to be (now the Central Bank building) off Dame Street, and was afterwards removed to a larger house opposite the Bank of Ireland building on College Green. On 6 January 1818, the new post-office in Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street) was opened for business. The foundation-stone of the building, which is built after a design of Francis Johnston, was laid by the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Charles Whitworth, 1st Earl Whitworth, on 12 August 1814, attended by the Post-Masters-General, Charles O'Neill, 1st Earl O'Neill? and Laurence Parsons, 2nd Earl of Rosse. The structure was completed in the short space of three years for the sum of ?50,000.

The front, which extends 67.1 metres (220 ft), has an Ionic portico (24.4 metres (80 ft) wide), of six fluted Ionic columns, 137.16 centimetres (54 inches) in diameter. The frieze of the entablature is highly enriched, and in the tympanum of the pediment were the royal arms until removed following restoration in the 1920s. On the acroteria of the pediment are three statues by John Smyth: Mercury on the right, with his Caduceus and purse; Fidelity on the left, with her finger on her lip and a key in her hand; and Hibernia in the centre, resting on her spear and holding a harp. The entablature, with the exception of the architrave, is continued along the rest of the front; the frieze, however, is not decorated over the portico. A balustrade surmounts the cornice of the building, which is 15.2 metres (50 ft) from the ground.

With the exception of the portico, which is of Portland stone, the whole is of mountain granite. The elevation has three stories, of which the lower or basement is rusticated, and in this respect it resembles the India House of London, where a rusticated basement is introduced, although the portico occupies the entire height of the structure.
During the Easter Rising of 1916, the GPO served as the headquarters of the uprising's leaders. The assault by the British forces extensively damaged the building and it was not repaired until the Irish Free State government took up the task some years later. The original columns outside are still pocked with bullet-marks. An original copy of the Proclamation of the Irish Republic is on permanent display in the GPO philatelic office. The building has remained a symbol of Irish nationalism. In commemoration of the Rising, a statue depicting the death of the mythical hero Cuchulainn is housed in the front of the building. This statue was featured on the Irish ten shilling coin of 1966 and on the "B Series" ?20 currency note. Despite its fame as an iconic place of Irish freedom, ground rent continued to be paid to English and American landlords until the 1980s.
The broadcasting studios of 2RN, which later became Radio Eireann, were located at the GPO from 1928 until the 1960s. Draws for Prize Bonds are held weekly, on Fridays, in the building. As of 2008, the Irish government is considering a proposal to incorporate an Easter Rising museum, a philatelic museum, a museum of Dublin and converting the two current courtyards into a larger civic space that may be used for future inauguration of the President.

Nelson's Pillar was formerly located in the centre of O'Connell Street adjacent to the GPO, however the Pillar was destroyed by the IRA in an explosion in 1966. The Spire of Dublin now takes a dominant position on the site of the Pillar.













THE GENERAL POST OFFICE DUBLIN




THE GENERAL POST OFFICE DUBLIN





The General Post Office (GPO) in Dublin is the headquarters of the Irish postal service An Post, and Dublin's principal post office. Sited in the centre of the city's main thoroughfare O'Connell Street, it is one of Ireland's most famous buildings and was the last of the great Georgian public buildings to be erected in the capital.
The GPO was at first held in a small building on the site of the Commercial Buildings near Dame Street, and was afterwards removed to a larger house opposite the bank on College Green (since converted into the Royal Arcade;) and on 6 January 1818, the new post-office in Sackville Street, later O'Connell Street, was opened for business. The foundation-stone of the building, which is built after a design of Francis Johnson, was laid by Charles Whitworth, 1st Earl Whitworth on 12 August 1814, and the structure was completed in the short space of three years, for the sum of ?50,000. The front, which extends 67.1 metres (220 feet), has a portico (24.4 metres (80 feet) wide), of six fluted Ionic columns, 137.16 centimetres (54 inches) in diameter. The frieze of the entablature is highly enriched, and in the tympanum of the pediment are the royal arms. On the acroteria of the pediment are three statues by John Smyth: Mercury on the right, with his Caduceus and purse; On the left Fidelity, with her finger on her lip, and a key in her hand; and in the centre Hibernia, resting on her spear, and holding her shield. The entablature, with the exception of the architrave, is continued along the rest of the front; the frieze, however, is not decorated over the portico. A handsome balustrade surmounts the cornice of the building, which is 15.2 metres (50 feet) from the ground. With the exception of the portico, which is of Portland stone, the whole is of mountain granite. The elevation has three stories, of which the lower or basement is rusticated, and in this respect it resembles the India House of London, where a rusticated basement is introduced, although the portico occupies the entire height of the structure. Over the centre of the building, a cupola contains the chimes and bell on which the clock-hammer strikes.

During the Easter Rising of 1916, it served as the headquarters of the uprising's leaders. The assault of the British forces extensively damaged the building and it was not repaired until the Irish Free State government took up the task some years later. The original columns outside are still pocked with bullet-marks. An original copy of the Proclamation is on permanent display in the GPO philatelic office. The building has remained a symbol of Irish nationalism and Irish national history. In commemoration of the failed Rising, a statue depicting the death of the mythical hero Cuchulainn is housed in the front of the building. This statue was featured on the Irish ten shilling coin of 1966 and on the "B Series" ?20 currency note. As of 2005, the Irish government intends to transfer all postal business from the GPO and dedicate the entire building to the commemoration of the Easter Rising. [1]
The studios of 2RN, and later Radio Eireann, were located at the GPO from 1928 until the 1960's.[2]
Formerly Nelson's Pillar was in front of the building, however this was destroyed by the IRA in an explosion in 1966. The Spire of Dublin now takes a dominant position in front of the building. Draws for Prize Bonds are held weekly, on Fridays, in the building.









decorating a small office space








decorating a small office space




Command 17067 Small Wire Hooks, 3 Hooks 4 Strips






3M Command Utensil Small Wire Hook 17067 Hooks & Hangers

Give household, kitchen, and personal items a place to live with the Command Small Wire Hooks, a damage-free solution for hanging items in your home and office. These sturdy hooks hold up to 1/2 pound. Thanks to the innovative Command Adhesive strips, you can mount and remount the hooks without damaging your walls--no nails, tacks, or tape required.
3M Command Brand Logo
Small Wire Hooks (White)

Weight Capacity: 0.5 pounds


Damage-free hanging leaves no sticky residue or stains on your wall
Each hook holds up to 1/2 pound
Apply and remove hooks in seconds
Hold strongly on a variety of surfaces, including paint, wood, and tile
Ideal for kitchens and for organizing jewelry, keys, and small personal items


3M Command Brand At a Glance

Command General-Purpose Hooks
A damage-free solution for hanging items in your home and office.
Innovative, Damage-Free Application
Easy application and removal keeps your walls damage free.
Command Products How-To

Ideal Hook for Organizing Household and Personal Items
The slim yet durable wire hooks are good for many household and kitchen items. Keep brushes and dustpans organized in your utility closet. In the kitchen, dedicate a few hooks for your aprons and baking and cooking utensils to make food prep easier.
These hooks can also help you organize your personal items. Hang umbrellas, dog leashes, and extra keys in a convenient place. Or mount some hooks by your dressing table or bathroom mirror to keep your necklaces and bracelets tangle-free and accessible.
Simple Application and Damage-Free Removal
Command General-Purpose Hooks and RefillApplying Command Hooks to just about any flat, clean surface is as easy as 1, 2, 3. Allow the adhesive strip an hour to set after application, and you'll be ready to hang any item up to 1/2 pound. An ideal alternative to nails, tacks, or tape, Command Adhesive holds strong, yet leaves no sticky residue or stains.
To remove, simply grasp the hook and stretch the Command Strip straight down until the base and strip release from the wall. With Command Hooks, redecorating or relocating items is easier than ever.
About Command Products: A Delight to Use and a Cinch to Remove
3M Command products offer simple, damage-free hanging solutions for many projects in your home and office. Simplify decorating, organizing, and celebrating with an array of general and decorative hooks, picture and frame hangers, organization products, and more.
Each Command product features innovative Command Adhesive Strips, which hold strongly on a variety of surfaces, including paint, wood, and tile. The adhesive removes cleanly, leaving no holes, marks, sticky residue, or stains. Replacement mounting strips are available, so you can use Command products again and again.
What's in the Box
Three Command Small Wire Hooks and four adhesive strips.

General-Purpose & Decorative Hooks

Hooks Mini
Weight Capacity: 0.5 pounds
Bullet6 hooks, 8 strips
Bullet40 strips, 48 clips (Value Pack)
Hooks Medium
Weight Capacity: 3 pounds
Bullet2 hooks, 4 strips
Bullet6 hooks, 12 strips (Value Pack)
Hooks Large
Weight Capacity: 5 pounds
Bullet1 hook, 2 strips (White)
Bullet1 hook, 2 strips (Green)
Bullet3 hooks, 6 strips (Value Pack)

Wire Hooks Small
Weight Capacity: 0.5 pounds
Bullet3 hooks, 4 strips
Bullet9 hooks, 12 strips (Value Pack)
Wire Hooks Medium
Weight Capacity: 3 pounds
Bullet2 hooks, 4 strips
Wire Hooks Large
Weight Capacity: 5 pounds
Bullet2 hooks, 4 strips

Traditional Hooks Medium
Weight Capacity: 3 pounds
Bullet1 hook, 2 strips (Brushed Nickel)
Traditional Hooks Large
Weight Capacity: 5 pounds
Bullet1 hook, 2 strips (Brushed Nickel)
3M Command strip Logo










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DECORATING BROWN WALLS - DECORATING BROWN


DECORATING BROWN WALLS - RETRO CHRISTMAS TREE DECORATIONS



Decorating Brown Walls





decorating brown walls






    decorating
  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it

  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)





    brown
  • fry in a pan until it changes color; "brown the meat in the pan"

  • (of bread) Made from a dark, unsifted, or unbleached flour

  • of a color similar to that of wood or earth

  • Of a color produced by mixing red, yellow, and black, as of dark wood or rich soil

  • an orange of low brightness and saturation

  • Dark-skinned or suntanned





    walls
  • Any high vertical surface or facade, esp. one that is imposing in scale

  • (wall) anything that suggests a wall in structure or function or effect; "a wall of water"; "a wall of smoke"; "a wall of prejudice"; "negotiations ran into a brick wall"

  • (wall) an architectural partition with a height and length greater than its thickness; used to divide or enclose an area or to support another structure; "the south wall had a small window"; "the walls were covered with pictures"

  • A continuous vertical brick or stone structure that encloses or divides an area of land

  • A side of a building or room, typically forming part of the building's structure

  • (wall) surround with a wall in order to fortify











decorating brown walls - Vehicle Wall




Vehicle Wall Decals - Brown Harley Motorcycle - 24 inch Removable Graphic


Vehicle Wall Decals - Brown Harley Motorcycle - 24 inch Removable Graphic



These Brown Harley Motorcycle Removable Wall Decals are not your standard vinyl wall stickers. Wallmonkeys uses premium Photo-Tex to produce decorative wall decals for the home, office space, or business. While Wallmonkeys has a wide selection of awesome kids wall decals, we are experts in creating custom business wall graphics. Wallmonkeys handles everything from trade show graphics to fundraisers, but our greatest joy is making you the STAR by creating one-of-a kind custom wall decals from your Photo! Still need convincing, free wall decals are available. See for yourself how Wallmonkeys features stack up. Our removable, reusable, self-adhesive wall decals will stick virtually anywhere and can be repositioned up to 100 times. And best of all, these affordable wall decals are made right here in the USA.










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David Hicks's living room: Coca-cola brown walls + white trim




David Hicks's living room: Coca-cola brown walls + white trim





In the 1960s, David Hicks lacquered the walls of his Chelsea living room in a color he called "Coca-Cola." The woodwork and ceiling are a bright white. Designer Peter Dunham: "This room sealed it — David Hicks was the James Bond of interior design. Wow! It's a great bold, sexy statement, and — much like somebody wearing a black dress — extremely flattering to the architecture and the things you put up against it. I would do it in Farrow & Ball Mahogany, a very dark brown, in a full gloss finish as he did, so it becomes luminous."

Photo courtesy of the David Hicks Estate, published in House Beautiful.











Warm neutral mix: Brown + white + ikat in Hamptons living room by Jeffrey Bilhuber, from Elle Decor




Warm neutral mix: Brown + white + ikat in Hamptons living room by Jeffrey Bilhuber, from Elle Decor





In Trey Laird's Hamptons library, Jeffrey Bilhuber covered the walls with chocolate wallpaper from Maya Romanoff. Bilhuber's Bridgewater sofa is upholstered with a Creation Baumann linen-cotton. Photo from Elle Decor, July/August 2007.









decorating brown walls







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DECORATIVE IRON WINDOW BARS : WINDOW BARS


DECORATIVE IRON WINDOW BARS : HOW TO DECORATE A ROUND TABLE : CAKE DECORATION DESIGNS.



Decorative Iron Window Bars





decorative iron window bars






    decorative
  • Relating to decoration

  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"

  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"

  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental

  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive





    window
  • a transparent opening in a vehicle that allow vision out of the sides or back; usually is capable of being opened

  • A pane of glass filling such an opening

  • An opening in a wall or screen through which customers are served in a bank, ticket office, or similar building

  • a framework of wood or metal that contains a glass windowpane and is built into a wall or roof to admit light or air

  • a transparent panel (as of an envelope) inserted in an otherwise opaque material

  • An opening in the wall or roof of a building or vehicle that is fitted with glass or other transparent material in a frame to admit light or air and allow people to see out





    iron
  • Smooth (clothes, sheets, etc.) with an iron

  • a heavy ductile magnetic metallic element; is silver-white in pure form but readily rusts; used in construction and tools and armament; plays a role in the transport of oxygen by the blood

  • cast-iron: extremely robust; "an iron constitution"

  • press and smooth with a heated iron; "press your shirts"; "she stood there ironing"





    bars
  • parallel bars: gymnastic apparatus consisting of two parallel wooden rods supported on uprights

  • (bar) barroom: a room or establishment where alcoholic drinks are served over a counter; "he drowned his sorrows in whiskey at the bar"

  • Prohibit (someone) from doing something

  • Prevent or forbid the entrance or movement of

  • Fasten (something, esp. a door or window) with a bar or bars

  • (bar) prevent from entering; keep out; "He was barred from membership in the club"











decorative iron window bars - Mrs. May's




Mrs. May's Trio Bar Variety Pack, 1.2-Ounce bars (Pack of 20)


Mrs. May's  Trio Bar Variety Pack, 1.2-Ounce bars (Pack of 20)



In a world of processed foods, endless ingredient lists, and high sugar treats Mrs. May's Naturals took a more basic approach. Why not combine simple and wholesome ingredients to make a delicious snack. Sounds easy, but it wasn't. While Mrs. May's treats go back more than two generations, we've re-worked and perfected our recipes to bring you the best possible product. The result is always the same: a deliciously light and crunchy snack that everybody loves. After introducing four flavors just a few years ago, Mrs. May's now offers 15 great varieties. Each made with premium grade ingredients such as roasted nuts, toasted sesame seeds, natural fruit pieces, organic evaporated cane juice, rice malt, and sea salt. The snacks are slowly dry roasted to bring out the most flavor, and to add a lively crunch! All Mrs. May's products are vegan, non-GMO, cholesterol free, dairy free, wheat free, Gluten free, 0 Trans Fat and contain no artificial colors or flavors. And our ingredients lists are short and sweet!










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Second Battery Armory




Second Battery Armory





Morrisania, Bronx

The Second Battery Armory, the first permanent armory located in The Bronx, was built in 1908-11 to the design of Charles C Haight, a former member of the New York State militia and a prominent architect known for his institutional buildings. Prominently situated on a sloping site, the armory is notable for its bold massing, expressive brick forms, picturesque asymmetry, and restrained Gothic vocabulary; the design of the structure retains references to the tradition of medieval imagery in earlier New York armory buildings, but bears a marked relationship to Collegiate Gothic institutions.

Having a large drill shed and an administrative building to the side, anchored by a corner tower, the armory was critically praised for its rational structural expression. Haight was awarded the commission, following a design competition, by the New York City Armory Board, the agency then authorized to construct new armories in the city.

The armory originally housed the Second Battery, a field artillery unit of the National Guard whose history dated to the Washington Gray Troop of 1833; units which were successors to the Second Battery remained in the building until the 1980s. Its location in the Morrisania section of The Bronx reflects the rapid growth of the borough at the turn of the century and the accompanying expansion of public services. A one-story addition to the armory (c. 1928), by architect Benjamin W. Levitan, along much of its Franklin Avenue frontage, modified Haight's original design through a skillful near-replication of its features. The Second Battery Armory remains one of the most distinctive public buildings in The Bronx.

The National Guard and Armories

The Second Battery Armory was built for a unit of the National Guard of the State of New York, long the largest and most active state militia in the country. The tradition of state militias remained strong in America from the Revolution through the nineteenth century; in 1792 Congress passed an act that established uniformity among the various state militias.

While the volunteer militia provided a large portion of the fighting forces in the nineteenth century, during the Civil War (at which time the name "National Guard" came into common usage) the readiness of the militia for warfare and its relationship to the standing army were called into question.

The New York Armory Law of 1862 attempted to address these issues by spurring the creation of regiments and armories, but met with little success in the aftermath of the war. With changes in American society in the second half of the nineteenth century - increasing industrialization, urbanization, labor union activity, and immigration - the role of the National Guard was affected, leading to its resurgence.

In the midst of a severe economic depression, the first nationwide general strike over working conditions occurred after a railroad strike in 1877; the National Guard was called to support police and federal troops against strikers and their supporters in dozens of American cities. Although units had been called previously to quell civil unrest, after 1877 the role of the National Guard was largely to control urban workers in strikes and "riots," and a wave of armory building began nationally.

The term "armory" refers to an American building type that developed in the nineteenth century to house volunteer state militias, providing space for drills, stables, storage, and administrative and social functions.

Aside from their military and police function, units of the National Guard were in large part social organizations; some, like the prestigious Seventh Regiment (first to adopt the term "national guard"), drew members from the social elite, while many others recruited primarily from local ethnic groups.

The earliest quarters for New York militia units were often inadequate rented spaces. The first regimental armory built in the city was the Tompkins Market Armory (1857-60), the result of a collaboration between the Seventh Regiment and the local butchers, in which a drill hall was above a market.

The Seventh Regiment later constructed its own armory (1877-79, Charles W. Clinton, 643 Park Avenue, a designated New York City Landmark), which had national influence in establishing the armory as a distinct building type while stimulating other New York units to build their own armories.

The Seventh Regiment Armory, modelled in plan after such nineteenth-century railroad stations as the first Grand Central Station, features a fortress-like administrative "headhouse" building with a central tower, connected to a drill shed which utilizes iron trusses to span a large space.

In 1884 the New York State Legislature created an Armory Board in New York City. The Board was charged with making the arrangements to condemn land for, to allocate funds for, and to authorize and oversee the construction, furnishing, and maintenanc











Entrance: Guy's Hospital




Entrance: Guy's Hospital





I can't believe I got this shot, the people traffic is not stop but I was determined.
Grade II* listed. Hospital and chapel. 1721-5 & 1728 with other C18 additions, part rebuilt later C20. Ranges around inner quadrangles, 1721-5; central main entrance block by Thomas Dance, 1728 (remodelled by Richard Jupp, 1774); east wing originally by James Steere, 1738-41, completely rebuilt in facsimile after World War II; chapel and west wing by Richard Jupp, 1774-7.
MATERIALS: centre block: multi-coloured stock brick and Portland stone; slate mansard with dormers behind brick parapet over stone cornice to outer sections. Wings similar, with stucco to ground floor; slate mansard with dormers with
alternating triangular and segmental pediments to side sections behind brick parapet above stone cornice.
PLAN: large forecourt with buildings on 3 sides, 2 inner quadrangles behind.
EXTERIOR: centre block: 3 storeys, sunk basement and attic, 13 bays. Projecting central frontispiece of 5 bays in stone with rusticated ground floor containing 5 round-headed openings
with rusticated voussoirs, the central 3 bays, with decorative wrought-iron gates and fanlights, forming an open arcade leading to the cloister behind, the outer ones glazed in round-headed recesses. Above, 4 giant Ionic attached columns flanked by 2 giant Ionic pilasters rise through 1st and 2nd floors to support entablature with paterae in frieze, with pediment above over central, slightly projecting 3 bays. 3 panels with bas reliefs of putti between 1st- and 2nd-floor windows, statues of Aesculapius and Hygeia in niches at 1st floor, and allegorical figures in tympanum all by John Bacon. Stone rustication continues across outer sections of ground floor, which are set in advance of upper floors and have rusticated voussoirs to recessed round-headed windows, and
balustraded parapet above. All windows are sashes with glazing bars and flat, gauged-brick arches.
West wing: 3 storeys and attic, 15 bays. Slightly projecting central section of 5 bays with ground-floor of rusticated stone containing round-headed sash windows with glazing bars in round-headed recesses with rusticated voussoirs and plain band at spring, the central opening a double door of 8 panelswith radial fanlight, cornice head, and iron gates with overhanging lamp holder. Keystones support cornice with broad band above containing balustraded panels beneath 1st-floor
windows. Stone architraves to 1st- and 2nd-floor windows, with pulvinated friezes and alternating triangular and segmental pediments over cornices to 1st-floor windows. Stone-coped pediment above stone cornice containing clock face. Side sections are stucco at ground floor with similar windows and doors with keystones supporting cornice beneath broad band at 1st-floor sills continuous with that across central section. All 1st- and 2nd-floor windows are sashes with glazing bars, outer sections with gauged, flat brick arches. Gabled end of 5 bays to street.
East wing (Boland House): a copy of west wing except that it has a sunk basement, a wind-vane dial in the pediment instead of a clock, and no doors to side sections or iron gates with overhanging lamp holder to central door. Unmatching, pedimented 5 bay end to street.
Chapel in centre block of west wing: Richard Jupp c1775 with remodelling of sanctuary, 1959. Almost square plan with galleries on 3 sides, altar at west end. Chapel, which is approached through narrow vestibule beneath east gallery which contains stairs leading to galleries, has aisle of 4 bays formed by Ionic columns supporting north and south galleries. A 5th bay to the west contains the sanctuary in the centre, a vestry to the north and an organ chamber to the south.
Entablature above columns has dentil cornice and fluted frieze with paterae, which continues along west wall, broken only by round arch with blue marble architrave, above altar. Round-arched (later) stained-glass windows to central 3 bays of sanctuary, a square-headed leaded one to each gallery either side. 5 sash windows to east gallery. Doors with radial fanlights to vestibule at east end.
In centre, a shallow niche with a monument in white marble to Thomas Guy by John Bacon, 1779. It depicts the founder assisting a sick man into his hospital which is shown in relief in the background. A decorative cast-iron railing forms semi-circle around. Groin-vaulted plaster gallery roof supported on columns with foliage capitals. Flat plaster ceiling to main body of chapel with circular motif in centre and framed by groined semi-vaults. Quadrangle ranges south of main entrance: rectangular plan with 2 inner courtyards separated by a loggia of 10 bays with round-headed arches on stone piers running north/south. British Listed Buildings











decorative iron window bars








decorative iron window bars




Clif Bar Energy Bar, Variety Pack of Chocolate Chip, Crunchy Peanut Butter, and Chocolate Chip Peanut Crunch, 2.4-Ounce Bars, Pack of 24






8 Crunchy peanut butter; 8 chocolate chip peanut butter; 8 oatmeal raisin walnut (now contains 8 chocolate chip instead of 8 oatmeal raisin walnut). Made with organic oats and soybeans. High in protein; no trans fats; 23 vitamins & minerals. Nutrition for sustained energy. Clif Bar supports organizations that address environmental, health and social issues. Clif Bar is named after my father, Clifford, my childhood hero and companion throughout the Sierra Nevada mountains. In 1990, I lived in a garage with my dog, skis, climbing gear, bicycle and two trumpets. The inspiration to create an energy bar occurred during a day-long, 175-mile ride with my buddy, Jay. We'd been gnawing on some other energy bars. Suddenly, despite my hunger, I couldn't take another bite. That's the moment I now call the epiphany. Two years later, after countless hours in Mom's kitchen, Clif Bar became a reality. And the mission to create a better-tasting energy bar was accomplished. Thanks, Mom! Clif Bar has grown since 1990, and still the spirit of adventure that began on that ride continues to thrive each day. As the company evolves, we face many choices, yet we always do our best to take care of our people, our community and our environment. - Gary, owner of Clif Bar. We source ingredients which do not contain wheat, dairy and are not genetically engineered. 70% Organic ingredients; certified organic by QAI.










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DECORATIVE WINDOW GUARDS. DECORATIVE WINDOW


Decorative window guards. Hawaiian home decorating



Decorative Window Guards





decorative window guards






    window guards
  • Small crossbars that are installed on apartment windows that prevent small children from falling out of a window. These are required by law for every apartment where a child under 10 lives and must be installed by the landlord at no cost to the tenant.

  • Official VW name for the aluminum rods mounted on the inside of the rear windows on Deluxe model buses to prevent luggage/cargo from hitting the rear windows. See slang term: Jailbars.





    decorative
  • (decoratively) in a decorative manner; "used decoratively at Christmas"

  • Serving to make something look more attractive; ornamental

  • (decorativeness) an appearance that serves to decorate and make something more attractive

  • Relating to decoration

  • cosmetic: serving an esthetic rather than a useful purpose; "cosmetic fenders on cars"; "the buildings were utilitarian rather than decorative"











decorative window guards - Door and




Door and Window Draft Stopper - Taupe


Door and Window Draft Stopper - Taupe



Help lower your energy bills all year round by insulating drafty doors and windows with a Draft-Dodger Door and Window Insulator. This decorative draft stopper measures a full three feet wide to fit in front of standard household doors and windows and effectively helps to eliminate the worst drafts and air leaks throughout a home. Door & Window Draft Stopper Features Strong and soft 100% polyester exterior finished in a stylish taupe to match a wide variety of home decor. Durable polyester fabric is surface washable. Insulator stuffed with styrene pellets and polyester fiberfill that effectively absorbs drafts. Bundles of gravel positioned to give extra weight and keep the draft blocker in place. Three foot width accommodates the bottom of most standard household doors and windows. Minimizes air leakage which can account for up to 40% of the total energy lost by an average household. A simple and inexpensive way to help lower energy bills all year round.










77% (11)





Knox Building




Knox Building





Midtown Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States of America

The Knox Building, one of the finest Beaux-Arts style commercial buildings in the city, was designed by the notable New York City architect John H. Duncan. Built in 1902-02 as the headquarters of the Knox Hat Company, the building occupies an especially prominent . midtown Manhattan location on Fifth Avenue at 40th Street opposite the New York Rib lie Library.

The Knox Hat Company had been founded in 1838 by Charles Knox at 110 Fulton Street, east of Broadway. Much of lower Manhattan had been devastated by a major fire in 1835. In the period of recovery which followed, New York's retail businesses began to locate along Broadway and the adjacent side streets.

The Knox Company undoubtedly benefited from the popularity of beaver hats during that period, and business prospered until the Civil War. Sometime after the Civil War the company was taken over by Edward M. Knox (18417-1916), son of the founder. The younger Knox had enlisted with the Eighth New York Volunteers in the Union army after the fall of Fort Sumter, supposedly when he was only 17.

Commissioned a second lieutenant in the 15th Independent Light Battery H of the Irish Brigade (69th Regiment), he fought in the battles of Fredericksburg, Chancellorsville, and Gettysburg. He was wounded in the last of these, and almost completely paralyzed by the bullet in his thigh he was carried to the rear and later found by his father in a ruined church at Gettysburg."

He remained paralyzed for over two years, but recovered after an operation and rest cure in Geneva, Switzerland. Knox then returned to New York to assume management of the family hat business.

The company had been having financial difficulties because of litigation over a trademark and the destruction of the Fulton Street store in the 1865 fire that burned down the nearby P.T. Barnum's museum at Broadway and Ann Street. Edward Knox turned the business around and continued to expand "with the intention of

making his name known wherever a hat was sold." The downtown store was rebuilt at 212 Broadway, next door to the National Park Bank.

This branch later moved into the Singer Building. As the fashionable shopping district moved northward on Broadway and Sixth Avenue to the area between Union Square and Madison Square, the Knox Hat Company followed the trend, opening another store in the Fifth Avenue Hotel at 23rd Street. Knox decided that the company should undertake its own hat manufacturing and established the Knox Hat Factory at St. Mark's and Grand Avenues in Brooklyn. A large brick structure with a corner tower, the guilding survives although without the mansard roof and four-faced clock that surmounted the tower. Below the clock was the inscription "Knox the Hatter."

Knox's own fortunes continued to expand with those of the company. He also invested profitably in real estate. In 1892 he was voted a medal of honor by the United States Congress for bravery at Gettysburg . The Grand Army of the Republic gave him a jeweled sword of honor as "the most popular and handsomest officer of the encampment." He was also elected colonel of the 69th Regiment and continued to use the title until his death.

By the turn of the century New York's retail trade was continuing its uptown move, establishing itself on Fifth Avenue between 34th and 42nd Streets. Among the prestigious merchants who located there were B. Altman (1906), Tiffany (1906), Gorham (1906), Lord & Taylor (1897-98), and Arnold Constable (1915-16). In 1901 Colonel Knox purchased land on the southwest corner of Fifth Avenue and 40th Street, across from the site of the recently vacated reservoir where the New York Public Library was under construction, and commissioned a building from the noted New York architect John H. Duncan.

Duncan (1855-1929), a founding member of the Architectural League of New York in 1881, had established his own architectural practice in 1886. Shortly thereafter he won the competition to design the Soldiers and Sailors Memorial Arch in Grand Army Plaza, Brooklyn, dedicated to the men who fought in the Union forces during the Civil War. Built in 1889-92, it is a monumental arch in the Roman Imperial tradition. In 1890 Duncan won the competition to design the General Grant National Memorial, more familiarly known as Grant's Tomb.

Built in 1891-97, It too was inspired by the Classical sources of Greek and Roman architecture. Colonel Knox had extensive connections with Civil War veterans and was an officer in the Grant Monument Association; undoubtedly Knox had met Duncan in his capacity as architect for the two memorials..

Following his work on the two monuments, Duncan began to acquire a clientele of affluent New Yorkers who commissioned him to design residences on the Upper East Side, in midtown Manhattan, and on West 76th Street. For his residential designs Duncan preferred the French sources pro











67 East 93rd Street House




67 East 93rd Street House





George F. Baker Jr. House, Upper East Side, Manhattan, New York City, New York, United States

This charming house was built in 1931 end designed in a modified version of the popular neo-Federal style by the prestigious firm of Delano & Aldrich. It forms a cohesive architectural unit with the larger George F. Baker, Jr., House complex to the east which includes the Synod of Bishops of the Russian Orthodox Church outside of Russia and 69 East 93rd Street, both designated New York City Landmarks, which were also designed by Delano & Aldrich.

The area in which the house is located acquired the name "Carnegie Hill" soon . after Andrew Carnegie erected his mansion at Fifth Avenue and 91st Street at the turn of the century.

Although middle-class residences had been built in the area in the 1880s and 1890s, Carnegie's move uptown inspired other well-to-do business and professional people to also build here—a trend which continued into the 1930s. George F. Baker, Jr. (1878-1937) began his banking career with J.P. Morgan, a close friend of his father, George F. Baker, known as the dean of American banking.

In the First National Bank of the City of Mew York, he rose from clerk to Vice-chairman and at the death of his father in 1931, succeeded him as Chairman of the Board. It was intended that George F. Baker, Sr., should live at No. 67 Fast 93rd Street, but he died before he could move in. In 1931 the property was transferred to Edith Baker, the wife of George F. Raker, Jr., who now lives in the house.

The four-story house is built of red brick laid in English bond and is carefully designed to harmonize with the larger Baker complex. The main doorway on the ground floor is enframed by stone and surmounted by an striking arched "broken" pediment enframing a motif of paired dolphins with central finial that includes the house number. A leaf-and-tongue molding decorates the lower chord of this pediment which is supported on console brackets. The subordinate service door is capped by a lintel with Greek fret motif at the ends. At the mezzanine above the first floor, small square windows are accented by stone enframements.

The two lower floors are separated from the upper stories by a broad bandcourse linking the house to the Baker complex. on the east. The tall parlor floor windows above the mezzanine have handsome curved wrought-iron window guards and pediment-shaped lintels with classical fruit ornaments, while the fourth floor windows have lintels displaying chain motifs. The house is crowned by a stone roof cornice with a decorative molding beneath it.

The architectural details and the carefully executed brickwork of this house are characteristic of the neo-Federal style and are used to charming effect. Carefully combined with the Baker complex on the east to form a cohesive architectural unit, this house adds distinction to the block and enhances the Carnegie Hill area.

- From the 1974 NYCLPC Landmark Designation Report









decorative window guards








decorative window guards




Door & Window Draft Stopper - Denim






Maintain lower energy all year round bills by insulating drafty doors and windows with a Denim Draft-Dodger Door and Window Insulator. This heavy duty decorative draft stopper measures a full three feet wide to fit in front of standard household doors and windows and effectively minimizes the worst drafts and costly air leaks. Denim Door & Window Draft Stopper Features Strong and soft 100% polyester exterior with a denim blue color. Durable polyester fabric is surface washable. Stuffed with styrene pellets and polyester fiberfill that effectively absorbs and eliminates drafts. Bundles of gravel are positioned to provide extra weight that keeps the draft blocker in place. Three foot width accommodates the bottom of most standard household doors and windows. Minimizes air leakage which may account for up to 40% of the total energy lost by an average household. A simple and inexpensive way to help keep energy bills low all year round. Also ideal for eliminating drafts from










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FALL TABLE DECORATIONS FOR WEDDING : FALL TABLE DECORATIONS


FALL TABLE DECORATIONS FOR WEDDING : HAWAIIAN HOME DECORATING : RUSTIC COUNTRY DECOR.



Fall Table Decorations For Wedding





fall table decorations for wedding






    table decorations
  • (table decoration) Any of many diverse articles placed on a dining table principally as ornament though some may have a secondary function





    wedding
  • a party of people at a wedding

  • A marriage ceremony, esp. considered as including the associated celebrations

  • the social event at which the ceremony of marriage is performed

  • marriage: the act of marrying; the nuptial ceremony; "their marriage was conducted in the chapel"





    fall
  • A move which pins the opponent's shoulders on the ground for a count of three

  • the season when the leaves fall from the trees; "in the fall of 1973"

  • An act of falling or collapsing; a sudden uncontrollable descent

  • A controlled act of falling, esp. as a stunt or in martial arts

  • descend in free fall under the influence of gravity; "The branch fell from the tree"; "The unfortunate hiker fell into a crevasse"

  • descend: move downward and lower, but not necessarily all the way; "The temperature is going down"; "The barometer is falling"; "The curtain fell on the diva"; "Her hand went up and then fell again"











My nemesis .......




My nemesis .......





..... these are sugar gerberas for a Ruby Wedding cake I am doing for this weekend. To say I have struggled with them is an understatement !

I've never made gerberas before but these were requested because the table decorations will be burgundy silk gerberas. The first set of cutters I used (FMM) produced such thin bases on the petals that they all kept tearing and falling off. This wasn't helped by the fact that the paste was so heavily loaded with colour that it wouldn't dry properly !

I then changed cutters to Jem daisy cutters, which were much better and I also decided to wire all the outside petals. This worked well but the instructions I was following in my book produced a flower that looked like a chrysanthemum rather a gerbera ... *sigh* !

So, back to the drawing board, and I decided to copy one of my photographs of a real gerbera. The result, I think, is much better now and I can live with it ! ;o))) LOL

I decided to opt for single gerberas, not doubles, as it was less work. The colour has not reproduced quite accurately here .... in real life it's a much deeper, richer burgundy.

All I have to do now (having seen this close-up ! ) is to smooth off the edges of the petals.

I'm not sure I'll be in too much of a rush to do gerberas again though! LOL

These are made in coloured flower(gum)paste dusted with a couple of other shades of red to give them a bit of "life" and then steamed ...... they're still a little shiny as they weren't quite dry when I photographed them.

I'm off to work now so will visit you all this evening ....
Explore 05.11.2009 #9











Rose posy




Rose posy





I've been making sugar flowers all week. These are going to be table decorations for a wedding. There were 12 rose posies and 12 lily posies. I now have goggle eyes and pink stained fingers:0)

P.S. This is the fabric I bought for my next wedding fair. I totally fell in love with it. (mainly because it sparkles!!)









fall table decorations for wedding







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