DECORATING A SMALL OFFICE SPACE. DECORATING A SMALL


Decorating A Small Office Space. 1930's Home Decor.



Decorating A Small Office Space





decorating a small office space







    decorating
  • (decorate) make more attractive by adding ornament, colour, etc.; "Decorate the room for the party"; "beautify yourself for the special day"

  • (decorate) deck: be beautiful to look at; "Flowers adorned the tables everywhere"

  • Make (something) look more attractive by adding ornament to it

  • Provide (a room or building) with a color scheme, paint, wallpaper, etc

  • (decorate) award a mark of honor, such as a medal, to; "He was decorated for his services in the military"

  • Confer an award or medal on (a member of the armed forces)





    space
  • an empty area (usually bounded in some way between things); "the architect left space in front of the building"; "they stopped at an open space in the jungle"; "the space between his teeth"

  • Position (two or more items) at a distance from one another

  • (in printing or writing) Put blanks between (words, letters, or lines)

  • Be or become distracted, euphoric, or disoriented, esp. from taking drugs; cease to be aware of one's surroundings

  • place at intervals; "Space the interviews so that you have some time between the different candidates"

  • the unlimited expanse in which everything is located; "they tested his ability to locate objects in space"; "the boundless regions of the infinite"











decorating a small office space - Organizing Your




Organizing Your Craft Space


Organizing Your Craft Space



Every crafter wants a work space that's usable, attractive, and well-organised, and here's how to achieve that goal. Inside this spiral-bound guide, with colour-coded pages for easy reference, are hints, tips, and dos and don'ts for each individual craft. There are craft categories so that individual problems are addressed (Mosaic and stained glass, knitting and crocheting, needlepoint and embroidery, scrapbooking and papercrafts, painting, beading, stencilling and rubber stamping, and sewing and fabric crafts). Plus, professional artists invite you into their studios to see how they keep things orderly, from smart storage to functional surfaces.










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General Post Office (GPO)




General Post Office (GPO)





The General Post Office (GPO) (Irish: Ard-Oifig an Phoist) in Dublin is the headquarters of the Irish postal service, An Post, and Dublin's principal post office. Sited in the centre of O'Connell Street, the city's main thoroughfare, it is one of Ireland's most famous buildings, and was the last of the great Georgian public buildings erected in the capital.
The GPO was at first located in a small building on the site of where the Commercial Buildings used to be (now the Central Bank building) off Dame Street, and was afterwards removed to a larger house opposite the Bank of Ireland building on College Green. On 6 January 1818, the new post-office in Sackville Street (now O'Connell Street) was opened for business. The foundation-stone of the building, which is built after a design of Francis Johnston, was laid by the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, Charles Whitworth, 1st Earl Whitworth, on 12 August 1814, attended by the Post-Masters-General, Charles O'Neill, 1st Earl O'Neill? and Laurence Parsons, 2nd Earl of Rosse. The structure was completed in the short space of three years for the sum of ?50,000.

The front, which extends 67.1 metres (220 ft), has an Ionic portico (24.4 metres (80 ft) wide), of six fluted Ionic columns, 137.16 centimetres (54 inches) in diameter. The frieze of the entablature is highly enriched, and in the tympanum of the pediment were the royal arms until removed following restoration in the 1920s. On the acroteria of the pediment are three statues by John Smyth: Mercury on the right, with his Caduceus and purse; Fidelity on the left, with her finger on her lip and a key in her hand; and Hibernia in the centre, resting on her spear and holding a harp. The entablature, with the exception of the architrave, is continued along the rest of the front; the frieze, however, is not decorated over the portico. A balustrade surmounts the cornice of the building, which is 15.2 metres (50 ft) from the ground.

With the exception of the portico, which is of Portland stone, the whole is of mountain granite. The elevation has three stories, of which the lower or basement is rusticated, and in this respect it resembles the India House of London, where a rusticated basement is introduced, although the portico occupies the entire height of the structure.
During the Easter Rising of 1916, the GPO served as the headquarters of the uprising's leaders. The assault by the British forces extensively damaged the building and it was not repaired until the Irish Free State government took up the task some years later. The original columns outside are still pocked with bullet-marks. An original copy of the Proclamation of the Irish Republic is on permanent display in the GPO philatelic office. The building has remained a symbol of Irish nationalism. In commemoration of the Rising, a statue depicting the death of the mythical hero Cuchulainn is housed in the front of the building. This statue was featured on the Irish ten shilling coin of 1966 and on the "B Series" ?20 currency note. Despite its fame as an iconic place of Irish freedom, ground rent continued to be paid to English and American landlords until the 1980s.
The broadcasting studios of 2RN, which later became Radio Eireann, were located at the GPO from 1928 until the 1960s. Draws for Prize Bonds are held weekly, on Fridays, in the building. As of 2008, the Irish government is considering a proposal to incorporate an Easter Rising museum, a philatelic museum, a museum of Dublin and converting the two current courtyards into a larger civic space that may be used for future inauguration of the President.

Nelson's Pillar was formerly located in the centre of O'Connell Street adjacent to the GPO, however the Pillar was destroyed by the IRA in an explosion in 1966. The Spire of Dublin now takes a dominant position on the site of the Pillar.













THE GENERAL POST OFFICE DUBLIN




THE GENERAL POST OFFICE DUBLIN





The General Post Office (GPO) in Dublin is the headquarters of the Irish postal service An Post, and Dublin's principal post office. Sited in the centre of the city's main thoroughfare O'Connell Street, it is one of Ireland's most famous buildings and was the last of the great Georgian public buildings to be erected in the capital.
The GPO was at first held in a small building on the site of the Commercial Buildings near Dame Street, and was afterwards removed to a larger house opposite the bank on College Green (since converted into the Royal Arcade;) and on 6 January 1818, the new post-office in Sackville Street, later O'Connell Street, was opened for business. The foundation-stone of the building, which is built after a design of Francis Johnson, was laid by Charles Whitworth, 1st Earl Whitworth on 12 August 1814, and the structure was completed in the short space of three years, for the sum of ?50,000. The front, which extends 67.1 metres (220 feet), has a portico (24.4 metres (80 feet) wide), of six fluted Ionic columns, 137.16 centimetres (54 inches) in diameter. The frieze of the entablature is highly enriched, and in the tympanum of the pediment are the royal arms. On the acroteria of the pediment are three statues by John Smyth: Mercury on the right, with his Caduceus and purse; On the left Fidelity, with her finger on her lip, and a key in her hand; and in the centre Hibernia, resting on her spear, and holding her shield. The entablature, with the exception of the architrave, is continued along the rest of the front; the frieze, however, is not decorated over the portico. A handsome balustrade surmounts the cornice of the building, which is 15.2 metres (50 feet) from the ground. With the exception of the portico, which is of Portland stone, the whole is of mountain granite. The elevation has three stories, of which the lower or basement is rusticated, and in this respect it resembles the India House of London, where a rusticated basement is introduced, although the portico occupies the entire height of the structure. Over the centre of the building, a cupola contains the chimes and bell on which the clock-hammer strikes.

During the Easter Rising of 1916, it served as the headquarters of the uprising's leaders. The assault of the British forces extensively damaged the building and it was not repaired until the Irish Free State government took up the task some years later. The original columns outside are still pocked with bullet-marks. An original copy of the Proclamation is on permanent display in the GPO philatelic office. The building has remained a symbol of Irish nationalism and Irish national history. In commemoration of the failed Rising, a statue depicting the death of the mythical hero Cuchulainn is housed in the front of the building. This statue was featured on the Irish ten shilling coin of 1966 and on the "B Series" ?20 currency note. As of 2005, the Irish government intends to transfer all postal business from the GPO and dedicate the entire building to the commemoration of the Easter Rising. [1]
The studios of 2RN, and later Radio Eireann, were located at the GPO from 1928 until the 1960's.[2]
Formerly Nelson's Pillar was in front of the building, however this was destroyed by the IRA in an explosion in 1966. The Spire of Dublin now takes a dominant position in front of the building. Draws for Prize Bonds are held weekly, on Fridays, in the building.









decorating a small office space








decorating a small office space




Command 17067 Small Wire Hooks, 3 Hooks 4 Strips






3M Command Utensil Small Wire Hook 17067 Hooks & Hangers

Give household, kitchen, and personal items a place to live with the Command Small Wire Hooks, a damage-free solution for hanging items in your home and office. These sturdy hooks hold up to 1/2 pound. Thanks to the innovative Command Adhesive strips, you can mount and remount the hooks without damaging your walls--no nails, tacks, or tape required.
3M Command Brand Logo
Small Wire Hooks (White)

Weight Capacity: 0.5 pounds


Damage-free hanging leaves no sticky residue or stains on your wall
Each hook holds up to 1/2 pound
Apply and remove hooks in seconds
Hold strongly on a variety of surfaces, including paint, wood, and tile
Ideal for kitchens and for organizing jewelry, keys, and small personal items


3M Command Brand At a Glance

Command General-Purpose Hooks
A damage-free solution for hanging items in your home and office.
Innovative, Damage-Free Application
Easy application and removal keeps your walls damage free.
Command Products How-To

Ideal Hook for Organizing Household and Personal Items
The slim yet durable wire hooks are good for many household and kitchen items. Keep brushes and dustpans organized in your utility closet. In the kitchen, dedicate a few hooks for your aprons and baking and cooking utensils to make food prep easier.
These hooks can also help you organize your personal items. Hang umbrellas, dog leashes, and extra keys in a convenient place. Or mount some hooks by your dressing table or bathroom mirror to keep your necklaces and bracelets tangle-free and accessible.
Simple Application and Damage-Free Removal
Command General-Purpose Hooks and RefillApplying Command Hooks to just about any flat, clean surface is as easy as 1, 2, 3. Allow the adhesive strip an hour to set after application, and you'll be ready to hang any item up to 1/2 pound. An ideal alternative to nails, tacks, or tape, Command Adhesive holds strong, yet leaves no sticky residue or stains.
To remove, simply grasp the hook and stretch the Command Strip straight down until the base and strip release from the wall. With Command Hooks, redecorating or relocating items is easier than ever.
About Command Products: A Delight to Use and a Cinch to Remove
3M Command products offer simple, damage-free hanging solutions for many projects in your home and office. Simplify decorating, organizing, and celebrating with an array of general and decorative hooks, picture and frame hangers, organization products, and more.
Each Command product features innovative Command Adhesive Strips, which hold strongly on a variety of surfaces, including paint, wood, and tile. The adhesive removes cleanly, leaving no holes, marks, sticky residue, or stains. Replacement mounting strips are available, so you can use Command products again and again.
What's in the Box
Three Command Small Wire Hooks and four adhesive strips.

General-Purpose & Decorative Hooks

Hooks Mini
Weight Capacity: 0.5 pounds
Bullet6 hooks, 8 strips
Bullet40 strips, 48 clips (Value Pack)
Hooks Medium
Weight Capacity: 3 pounds
Bullet2 hooks, 4 strips
Bullet6 hooks, 12 strips (Value Pack)
Hooks Large
Weight Capacity: 5 pounds
Bullet1 hook, 2 strips (White)
Bullet1 hook, 2 strips (Green)
Bullet3 hooks, 6 strips (Value Pack)

Wire Hooks Small
Weight Capacity: 0.5 pounds
Bullet3 hooks, 4 strips
Bullet9 hooks, 12 strips (Value Pack)
Wire Hooks Medium
Weight Capacity: 3 pounds
Bullet2 hooks, 4 strips
Wire Hooks Large
Weight Capacity: 5 pounds
Bullet2 hooks, 4 strips

Traditional Hooks Medium
Weight Capacity: 3 pounds
Bullet1 hook, 2 strips (Brushed Nickel)
Traditional Hooks Large
Weight Capacity: 5 pounds
Bullet1 hook, 2 strips (Brushed Nickel)
3M Command strip Logo










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